Regulatory Capture of ICANN

One of the worst dimensions of internet stability is apparent corruption at the top.

Regulatory capture by the current registry operators of .com and .net (Verisign) and .org (PIR & Ethos Capital)is unsurprising in that billions of dollars are involved without transparent public tenders and open-bid contract. Hugely valuable properties in the public domain are assigned in sweetheart deals.

A recent ICANN staff exercise gathered public comment on proposed .com price increases (and also assorted regressive strictures on domain name owners in favor of governments). It seems the Verisign registry has successfully coopted ICANN staff with a promise of US$20,000,000.

8998 comments were received, hugely against price increase to .com

Comments closed 14 Feb 2020. Here they are (8998 in total):
https://mm.icann.org/pipermail/comments-com-amendment-3-03jan20/2020q1/date.html

Did any of the proposed changes attract substantive supporting comments. I think not.

But the agreement is already formulated in principle. Public comment should have been solicited earlier. And our failure to rubber-stamp means nothing.

Ultimately, ICANN staff report to the ICANN Board of Directors, but in consultation with the Board, ICANN staff guide decisions.

"Presumptive renewal" is acting in restraint of trade.
I checked which so-called "independent" blog authors and domain authorities commented against the price hikes. Remembering the billions at stake, some individual names may be missing from the comment list above as they hope to cultivate favor with Verisign or ICANN staff. In other words, you don't see the names of the ass-lickers.

Costly NOT to BUY?

I own the domain name Glowup.com

We began Glowup in 1995 offering people assistance with their personal strategies. We charge fees as tutor / consultants. In 2003 we expanded to internet and online assistance.

Glowup.com offers worldwide services:
  •       Life Strategies
  •       Achievement Tutoring
  •       Legacy & Estate planning services
We're a small business.
With an expanding range of requests to buy the domain name, we decided we'd sell and rebrand if the price were right. So we now announce at the bottom of our main webpage:

We're repeatedly asked to sell domain Glowup.com
Many firms trade on the GLOWUP name (count)
US$70,000 could buy Glowup.com on 2020-01-15
(if direct purchase; price open to change)
Financing available


help@strongestbrands.com

Many firms trade in the same space, though in assorted industries and in various parts of the world.

If a major player buys the popular name, these many other Glowup firms have reason for concern. Heavy global marketing of Glowup as a new consumer good or service will surely interfere with their business. Sorry!

It is Costly NOT to BUY.


Kissing English Rump

The people of Asia have many reasons to be proud of their learning & civilization.

Chinese society especially has a long and glorious history. Japan and Korea are also great.

At the dawn of the world wide web, internet addresses were designed to use only English characters: abcd, numbers, dash - and period .

Many organizations worldwide built websites using anglicization of their names. Swedish organizations dropped ä ö å characters, France ignored the é while Denmark substituted for Ø.

But for many years now, it's been possible to use non-English characters, IDN International Domain Names.

It is also very easy to add such domain names as an alternative door to any website.

Why do Asian firms often continue using only abcde domains? The colonial mentality remains. Let's instead Be Proud of local languages.

Give the English speakers a backdoor to your website (maybe). But proudly use your local language. Build more on the many great Chinese, Japanese, Korean & other global language domains, and surely get .com for global access.

NO more kiss the English arse!

Fantastic domains include:

善.com

子.com

互.com

士.com

極.com

ॐ.com

気.com

陰.com

旬.com

1番.com

만.com

१.com

لله.com   

発.com

か.com

שָׁלוֹם.com

 etc...