Open Many Doors for More Contacts

Skilled Professional:
Your Web presence should include IDN and otherwise.

Well-designed homes have multiple entrances.
Any easily-recalled word can route visitors to an associated homepage.

Add streams of direct navigation traffic:
Benefit from forwarding / redirect or domain pointing
type-in IDN.com >> for example, 子.com
Help consumers to find you. Position yourself: The Established Authority:
book.com = books.com = bn.com = barnesandnoble.com

Here's a simple forwarding page:
(Load as default.htm and change URL and TITLE)

<HTML>
<META HTTP-EQUIV=REFRESH CONTENT="0; URL=http://xn--i8s.com">
<TITLE>Child</TITLE>
<BODY BGCOLOR="#FFFFFF" TEXT="#FFFFFF" LINK="#FFFFFF" VLINK="#FFFFFF" ALINK="#FFFFFF">
<br>
</BODY>
</HTML>

Add great IDN gateways now, before costs soar.

Beautiful may be Best!
Catch human imagination.
Link a great concept to your products & services.
Forward people to your products & services.
More profits from More Access.

Twelve Domains?



Most users don’t understand they can have MANY easily-remembered keyword domains in multiple languages feeding leads into their main site. So not A or B — but A plus B plus C plus D …

Use simple forwarders to expand business footprint & effectiveness.

example:
You are "Bill's Beds" and make the "Heaven Mattress" in Texas
your main site is maybe BillsBeds.com

But if you can, get keywords (in English & Spanish):
bill.com
bills.com
bed.com
mattress.com
sleep.com
heaven.com
rest.com  
cama.com
colchón.com
dormir.com
cielo.com
descanso.com

Texasbed.com
Texasmattress.com

You want names people hear once and remember. They forward to your main page. Allow people to access your online business from many doors and bridges. After you've bought such domains, each costs only about $10 annually - even one lead a year makes diversification worthwhile.

Are You an IP Broker?

My company actively sells domain names. We develop some properties, and often earn rent for advertising.

I could be called a "domainer"

But there are alternate titles, perhaps more precise:

  • Intellectual Property (IP) Broker
  • IP Salesman
  • IP Merchant
  • IP Marketer


Dot Com is King

There are key benefits to a .com domain over a cc-TLD (country code top-level domain, such as .uk or .au).

Surnames / corporate names are great examples. "Garcia" is common to many countries. "Hernández" is the most common family name in Mexico, and widespread in Spain, the Philippines, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic, and elsewhere. Only one person can own Hernández.com



Many Hernández cousins want this name.
Each domain can also host unlimited great email addresses.

We see bias & preference among many potential customers. Some 300,000 Finns who speak Swedish as their mother tongue (without being Swedish) may dislike using suffix .se 

Millions more non-Swedes who speak Swedish may prefer .com

Internet Treasures

A few thousand written characters are used worldwide. The majority are Chinese, many of these same characters are used in Japanese, and most have become .com domains.

Symbols and emoji also exist, although very few are allowed registration as .com domains.

Only three (3) single-character ASCII domain names are allowed & operational as .com

Q


X


Z



The above three domains registered long ago were "grandfathered" - each is now worth multi-million dollars, because few single-character names exist. But hundreds of single-character.com exist in other languages!

Each International Domain Names (IDN) can be both typed on a specialty keyboard (as used in each appropriate nation), or entered using "puncode" - an alternative input method for limited Western-language keyboards. Punycode always begins with these four characters: xn--

Of course, the domain owner decides content on each remarkable site.
They can market businesses or promote individuals.
Some make money advertising.

Single-character .com domain names are highly prestigious.
Single-character.com domain names are also fun. Get yours now!





Our World Ain't English

Many people are still in the dark about international domain names (IDN), and the fact your website or email address can use non-English characters. This has now been operational for over ten years!

But what about consumers with a standard English-language keyboard and no knowledge of alternative input methods?

How to handle such situations easily:

Build your full website on your true name using native characters.
For example,
Arté.com

Then build a forwarder on another English or Anglicized name,
for example, 
Arte-english.com
auto-forwarding to English-language page on your main IDN site.

Consumers can then bookmark either page.

SUCCESS !

Of course, the clever consumer knows also how to use punycode (xn--art-dma.com for the above Arté.com) or will quickly cut-and-paste.



Single-Character.com Unique

We offer a new investment portfolio of 520 single-character .com domains. Price for the total package is US$750,000. The portfolio consists of Chinese and Japanese .com domains.

In coming years we expect the value of this portfolio to grow tremendously. More and more organizations are discovering International Domain Names, and each of these domains has intrinsic and key meaning, pointing to value and credibility. Each is brief & to-the-point as a single character .com

Many users seek something uniquely special (and are willing to pay substantially).

Global Brand Appeal

Single-character.com Investment Portfolio

http://reorient.com/invest

Verisign: Billion Dollar NO BID Contract?

Against Proposed Renewal of six-year .NET registry agreement between ICANN and Verisign

Expected monopoly collection of revenues via exclusive no-bid contract :
One Billion US Dollars (approx. $1,000,000,000.00)

Regarding proposed .NET registry renewal posted by ICANN at:
https://www.icann.org/public-comments/net-renewal-2017-04-20-en
>>> public comment possible to 30 May 2017, 23:59 UTC

Summary Position of this Comment: STRONG OPPOSITION

It is irregular to award a huge monopoly contract with no open tender. Presumptive renewal of a contract this size is outside standard business practices, and reflects inadequate / substandard oversight, disregarding public interest. Opening this contract to competition will help lower user costs, largely eliminate unjustified windfall profits, and greatly reduce the appearance of potential corruption.

The reasoning for many changes in this contract is said to be "Updated for consistency with registry agreements for other gTLDs." But we understand the .NET Registry Monopoly is fundamentally unlike other registry agreements with the major exception of the .COM Registry Monopoly (also peremptorily arrogated to Verisign). Other commercial gTLDs passed through a competitive proposal & tendering process that both Verisign and ICANN would hereby dodge, giving the appearance of inappropriate collusion. This proposed renewal and its terms promise to harm consumers.

As of today (late May, 2017), the domain name base for .net is approximately 15,000,000 domains.

Considering approximately 15 million annual .NET registrations, and a contract term of six years, with Registry Operator service fee of US$8.20 and authorized increases of 10% at start of each calendar year
from July 2017: $8.20/yr  (assuming half year, 7.5m domains) Revenues: US$61,500,000
from Jan 2018: $9.02/yr  (15m domains)  Revenues:  US$135,300,000
from Jan 2019: $9.92/yr  (15m domains)  Revenues:  US$148,800,000
from Jan 2020: $10.91/yr  (15m domains)  Revenues:  US$163,650,000
from Jan 2021: $12.00/yr  (15m domains)  Revenues:  US$180,000,000
from Jan 2022: $13.20/yr  (15m domains)  Revenues:  US$198,000,000
from Jan 2023: $14.52/yr through June 30, 2023  (assuming half year, 7.5m domains) Revenues:  US$108,900,000

So this non-competitive ("sweetheart") agreement will generate total expected revenues of about One Billion US Dollars (US$996,150,000 without market growth). This situation demands competitive tendering.

The reasoning detailed above does not reflect immoderate or bad behavior by Verisign, a corporation richly rewarded with repeat non-bid contracts as the "authoritative directory" and "exclusive registry" of all .NET and .COM domain names.

During the six-year period of this agreement however, in my opinion, Verisign damaged the .NET and .COM brands, eroding ownership rights with poorly managed operations regarding transliterations of .NET and .COM into multiple languages. ICANN was involved in this process.

In 2012 Verisign applied to ICANN, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, for so-called gTLD internationalized domain name transliterations of .com and .net in assorted major languages. There's been many billions of dollars invested in existing .com and .net domains, so Verisign and ICANN needed to avoid controversy and the threat this process would erode ownership rights or seriously confuse the market.

International domain names (IDN) can be convenient for end-users typically operating in non-English scripts such as Cyrillic, Chinese, Arabic or Hindi, relieving the need to toggle between different text-input keyboards. ICANN oversaw expansion of the gTLD system. ICANN accepted Verisign's applications for transliterations of .com and .net in assorted major languages although Verisign had only temporary time-limited contracts as the "authoritative directory" and "exclusive registry" of all .NET and .COM domain names.

Verisign's policy on IDN.IDN implementation, and the rights protection format they proposed to follow, was very explicit, with a key objective: "Avoid costs to consumers and businesses from purely defensive registrations in the new gTLDs."  They asserted: "A registrant in one of the IDN TLDs, or a registrant of an IDN.com or IDN.net, will have the sole right, but not be required to register the exact same second level name across all or any of our IDN TLDs, including the .com or .net TLDs as applicable."

With this widely publicized explanation, Verisign avoided opposition by .net and .com owners against Verisign's planned offerings. Some of us registered IDN.net and IDN.com domains expecting our positions would be securely protected by Verisign.

Instead, Verisign launched the first of the transliterations (also termed "aliasing"), largely unconnected to existing .com ownership, although a Priority Access Program allowed existing registrants early purchase of Verisign's transliteration, typically at premium pricing. It is unclear if changes in plan were initiated by Verisign or ICANN, but both now squeeze added revenues from resulting format changes. Ultimately, if I owned lawyer.com -- another person might buy lawyer.コム (or lawyer .ком with Japanese or Russian ".com" and pronounced nearly identically). Defensive registrations are costly, with both Verisign & ICANN reaping benefits from what now appears a collusive relationship undercutting ownership rights in .NET and .COM domain names.

This was wholly different from Verisign's long-time presentation: (Verisign quoted below until 'end quote' mention)  "In 2012, Verisign applied to operate registries for eight transliterations of .COM and three of .NET (to the right of the dot) as part of ICANN’s new generic top-level domain (gTLD) which will allow Verisign to bring businesses full domain names in local language characters. Verisign’s proposed approach for these new IDN gTLDs will help ensure a ubiquitous end-user experience and helps to protect consumers and business from having to register purely defensive domain names in our TLDs. In practice, Verisign’s proposed approach means that the registrant for a second-level domain name in our IDN.IDN, IDN.com or IDN.net will have the sole right (subject to applicable rights protection mechanisms), but not be required to register that identical second-level domain in any of the top-level IDNs, .COM or .NET as applicable. In order to illustrate our approach, we have identified two use cases below:
Use Case No. 1: Bob Smith already has a registration for an IDN.net second level domain name. That second level domain name will be unavailable in all of the new .NET TLDs except to Bob Smith. Bob Smith may choose not to register that second level domain name in any of the new transliterations of the .NET TLDs.
Use Case No. 2: John Doe does not have a registration for an IDN.com second level domain name. John Doe registers a second level domain name in our Thai transliteration of .COM but in no other TLD. That second level domain name will be unavailable in all other transliterations of .COM IDN TLDs and in the .COM registry unless and until John Doe (and only John Doe) registers it in another .COM IDN TLD or in the .COM registry"
(end quote)

Verisign effectively precluded much opposition to their applications. Such outcry would have been certain, because using similar-sounding and identical-meaning tlds seriously dilutes domain-owner rights, and can lead to confusion.

Verisign & ICANN's new approach harms existing .com & .net domain owners. Now we are forced to try to protect our position with defensive registrations of their new .IDN domains. With Verisign's premium pricing, a single gTLD registration may cost hundreds or even thousands of dollars. Those defensive-registration revenues mostly benefit Verisign, but ICANN also receives a fixed component of each registration's revenues.

We understand that over many years, conditions and strategies and markets may change. We can assume the expansive proprietary assertions of Verisign were always well-meant, and later changes were always legal.

In the interest of all parties, standard business practices today avoid monopoly contracts without open tender. Both the .NET & .COM Registry Monopolies should be open to competitive tender.

A billion reasons shout why this contract should be open to bid.

Helsinki Brand?

The sub-Arctic city of Helsinki, Finland, is waking up to Place Appeal.

But it's much too little, far too late.

They built their new marketing effort at    bnh.fi

It means Brand New Helsinki.  Finland is  .fi

Sorry to be critical, but  bnh.fi  is not quick & easy to understand or remember.

Going to the site becomes worse: at http://bnh.fi/en/share-your-helsinki-2020/ they offer a two-minute video, half in Finnish -- without subtitles. It effectively draws attention to difficulties with Finnish language, and a local disregard for non-Finns.

I do believe Helsinki, and Finland generally, could compete for top global talent. But they're relying upon bad advice filtered through a rigid, well-paid bureaucracy.

Fundamentally they need to overcome a chilly dark environment, a somewhat drab population (who themselves dream to escape), a perceived proximity to Chernobyl, relatively poor multicultural infrastructure, etc. etc. Worse, they're competing against places who began long ago to seriously invest in the high-stakes Place Appeal effort.

Finland (and Helsinki) must analyze the importance of Place Appeal to cultivate investment, generate tourism, attract mobile experts, and develop creative talent.

They need to understand the HUGE economic impact of the Place Appeal investment versus collapsing property values & continually watching creative people migrate away. For any locality seeking good future positioning, spending a few million euro is actually nothing compared to the many costs of failing to thrive.

Wish them luck.        but...
... at this rate, Helsinki's marketers fulfill their rhyming destiny:
FINISH






Short .com Domains are Valuable !

It's still possible for smaller businesses and private individuals to own short .com domains without investing many hundreds of thousands of dollars. The LLLL.com domains (four letters) are perhaps the shortest easily achievable, with many priced far below US$10,000.

Such very short domains are quite easy to resell if desired; an investment put to use! Don't forget: with a great domain you can create both a permanent web presence and also unlimited great email addresses. Happy shopping!

Here are some bargains:


 
iowu.com 
Couq.com 
Peuv.com 
9ass.com 
Rub2.com 
D--r.com 
inn3.com 
Ate3.com 
Kat2.com 
Num8.com 
Ozwk.com 
USD3.com 
N0M0.com 
64oz.com 
K--t.com 
24vv.com 
ero7.com 
7up7.com 
6mom.com 
4ray.org 
6kid.com 
rny8.com 
6an6.com 
4orr.com 
2nag.com 
69nu.com 
4got.org 
16-4.com 
2--4.com 
M--m.com 
69dr.com 
3jet.com 
5cab.com 
4sme.com 
2Feb.com 
Zjoq.com 

Invest in China

There are many ways to protect and to multiply your money. Probably, diversification is important -- don't invest all your funds in one company's stocks, or all in gold. Spread your investments into different formats for protection. Digital assets promise future growth.

China is growing. China has a bright future. Chinese people have only begun to discover the value of great domain names, and that there is a dynamic market for premium domains.

It is possible to buy fundamental one-character .com Chinese names, such as  子.com

Better, buy a .com portfolio of 520 single-character names

The investment portfolio costs US$750,000. Value in five years could be 10 times, maybe 50 times more!  Good luck; but act fast -- only one collection available, at:
http://reorient.com/invest

High Way

Medical marijuana, pot & cannabis are growing industries. Many people might themselves happily refuse to smoke reefer, but why should we deprive cancer-ridden elderly in the midst of chemotherapy & radiation treatment, who claim eating marijuana cookies takes their mind off pain, with minimal side effects.

We don't support illegality. But many U.S. states and assorted nations around the world allow use of marijuana for medical purposes, and some (Colorado) allow adult recreational usage (just for fun).

Colorado is reportedly the fastest growing economy in the United States (link).

Cannabis-related news & information is important, and hemp & marijuana domain names have been selling well. (Marijuana.com sold for US$4.20 million in 2011). Here are pot domains still available now, and at low prices:


420cocktail.com
                                            always420.com
BongBrand.com
                                            bongg.com
BudBrand.com
                                            BuddingBrand.com
ediblast.com
                                            edibled.com
ediblender.com
                                            edibless.com
Ediblessing.com
                                            Edibling.com
ediblink.com
                                            ediblitz.com
Faqdup.com
                                            GanjaTrust.com
GrowninHawaii.com
                                            GrownOnHawaii.com
HempBrandy.com
                                            HerbalHawaii.com
HerbBrand.com
                                            High-Potency.com
LikeBud.com
                                            LikeGanja.com
LikeReefer.com
                                            LikeToSmoke.com
Mediblended.com
                                            mediblender.com
Mediblending.com
                                            Medibless.com
Mediblessing.com
                                            Mediblink.com
MrStoned.com
                                            NuHigh.com
PotHot.com
                                            ProfitsHerbal.com
PunaJuice.com
                                            ReefBrand.com
ReeferBrand.com
                                            ReeferFund.com
Reefresher.com
                                            Reefreshment.com
Reefuse.com
                                            StoneBrand.com
Stoniness.com
                                            SurfBud.com
WeLovePot.com
                                            麻省.com
たばこ.com
                                            麻木.com
Хай.com
                                            胡麻.com
麻薬.com
                                            삼.com
禁酒.com
                                            Дым.com
Høj.com
                                            汉麻.com
Rökare.com
                                            ポット.com
Zedible.com

Clear opportunities in the 'edible' category, etc.

Which domain name do you think is most valuable?
Good luck !



Domain Sales Assistance

Afternic, GoDaddy, Sedo, Flippa and DomainNameSales.com each do decent work of supporting domain sales processes.

But there are many additional ways potential domain purchasers can be helped to better connect with domain owners.

I'd like to be able to sign-up for a Notification to learn when a website or domain price changes. This could greatly assist both potential buyers and sellers. Domaintools offers assorted monitor services (by paid subscription) for a wide universe of domains. But the above sales agents could easily offer such charting & monitoring for those portfolio they handle.

Should detail of who is 'watching' be shared with sellers? If I ran a firm named similarly to one I was monitoring, I'd prefer to stay anonymous (keeping price lower). As a general entrepreneur as yet uninvested in a name, perhaps I've no preference for anonymity. Agencies could offer both monitoring options.


Single-character Chinese .com

Single-character domains are not yet selling publicly for great amounts of money, but in a heartbeat that could change.

Only three ASCII English .com are operating: x.com, q.com and z.com

Other potential single-letter .com are reserved by the IANA (Internet Assigned Numbers Authority) since 1993, and not ever expected to be released. Some symbols such as ✫.com were purchased early and grandfathered to allow continued operation.

Single-character Chinese .com are now hugely undervalued. As China grows and gains confidence, many people will want native-language top domains. If hundreds of thousands of people desire a property, it becomes expensive. We see five years from now, Chinese single-character .com domains trading at US$20,000 to US$1,000,000+ each.

秘.com

買.com

旬.com

町.com

子.com

How soon will such great names be owned by Chinese companies?
Someone will wisely purchase the US$750,000 .com portfolio now on sale. A full 520 one character .com domains, mainly Chinese / Japanese single characters. See full list at:

reorient.com/invest

Verisign Sucks?

Emboldened by Vox Populi's .sucks registry success, Verisign now seem ready to embark on the "legalized extortion" path.

Will IDN.com domain holders be denied the grandfathering Verisign promised for many years? Verisign avoided domain name community complaints about transliteration confusion by promoting exclusive cross-linkages between the assorted versions of .com (or .net). Now they've a contract and suddenly sing a different tune.

Classic bait-and-switch.

They assured us: "the registrant for a second-level domain name in our IDN.IDN, IDN.com or IDN.net will have the sole right (subject to applicable rights protection mechanisms), but not be required to register that identical second-level domain in any of the top-level IDNs."

Hopefully Verisign will reconsider. Dissolving the IDN.IDN link to .com (or .net) weakens Verisign's position & suitability as contracted authoritative registry for .com and .net -- making a future switch away from Verisign easier: the .com contract expires end Nov. 2018.

Verisign Lies?

http://www.verisigninc.com/en_GB/channel-resources/domain-registry-products/idn/index.xhtml?loc=en_GB
Verisign has now been promising for many years as follows:

"In 2012, Verisign applied to operate registries for eight transliterations of .COM and three of .NET (to the right of the dot) as part of ICANN’s new generic top-level domain (gTLD) which will allow Verisign to bring businesses full domain names in local language characters.

Verisign’s proposed approach for these new IDN gTLDs will help ensure a ubiquitous end-user experience and helps to protect consumers and business from having to register purely defensive domain names in our TLDs. In practice, Verisign’s proposed approach means that the registrant for a second-level domain name in our IDN.IDN, IDN.com or IDN.net will have the sole right (subject to applicable rights protection mechanisms), but not be required to register that identical second-level domain in any of the top-level IDNs, .COM or .NET as applicable.

In order to illustrate our approach, we have identified two use cases below:
Use Case No. 1: Bob Smith already has a registration for an IDN.net second level domain name. That second level domain name will be unavailable in all of the new .NET TLDs except to Bob Smith. Bob Smith may choose not to register that second level domain name in any of the new transliterations of the .NET TLDs.
Use Case No. 2: John Doe does not have a registration for an IDN.com second level domain name. John Doe registers a second level domain name in our Thai transliteration of .COM but in no other TLD. That second level domain name will be unavailable in all other transliterations of .COM IDN TLDs and in the .COM registry unless and until John Doe (and only John Doe) registers it in another .COM IDN TLD or in the .COM registry"
(end quote)

But yesterday in Verisign's Q2 2015 Earnings Report Conference Call, it all seems revealed as empty promises.

Jim Bidzos, Verisign Executive Chairman, President and CEO, stated:
"Based primarily on feedback from domain name community stakeholders, we have revised our IDN launch strategy. We will offer these new IDN top-level domains as stand-alone domain names, subject to normal introductory availability and rights protection mechanisms available to all new gTLDs. This revised approach will not require ICANN approval and is designed to provide end users and businesses with the greatest flexibility; and, for registrars, a simple and straightforward framework to serve the market. Finally, we believe this approach should provide the best opportunity for increased universal acceptance of IDNs. We expect to begin a phased rollout of the IDNs towards the end of this year. And we'll provide more information on our launch plans when appropriate."
Pat Kane later adds detail: they plan to launch without the cross-linkages they promised.

Maybe I misread, but it appears blatant bait-and-switch by Verisign.
Can the weasels unilaterally take away residual rights promised & promoted for many years?

Domains = Bullish (or bullshit?)

I'm consistently bullish on the future promise of premium domain names. The internet continues to expand globally, with great names (especially .com) in high demand.

But let's not be blind.

There are major impediments to successful domain investing. Choosing & handling hundreds (or thousands) of domains requires multiple skill types.

Domain markets are not very liquid, so it can be difficult to sell quickly.

Worse, major registrars and parking companies are themselves in business as direct competitors. Almost all of these firms buy and sell domains, and catch names at the daily drop. It's hazardous to need to rely upon your competitors to run your business. Within the domain industry there's much secrecy about parking revenues and domain sales amounts. A few major players are positioned to know and learn much more than the average joe. This leads inevitably to conflict-of-interest situations.

Major industry news and blogger reports reflect the prejudices and needs of competitive forces far larger than the typical small investor.

Some 100,000 domains drop everyday.

Each dropped name is a dream that didn't work out -- a failed project.

Sure there are exceptions (ten years later, event2004.com may naturally be worth little). But such exceptions are few.

Every drop is a list of broken dreams, a trail of tears.

Celebrate success, but recognize risk.

 


Verisign transliterations: aliasing .com



Verisign will offer chances for aliasing .com with these nine transliterations:

.com
(present Western) 

.ком
Cyrillic
xn--j1aef

קום.
Hebrew
xn--9dbq2a

كوم.
Arabic
xn--fhbei

.कॉम
Devanagari
xn--11b4c3d

.คอม
Thai
xn--42c2d9a

.コム
Katakana
xn--tckwe

.
Simplified Chinese
xn--3pxu8k

.
Hangul
xn--mk1bu44c