Helsinki Brand?

The sub-Arctic city of Helsinki, Finland, is waking up to Place Appeal.

But it's much too little, far too late.

They built their new marketing effort at    bnh.fi

It means Brand New Helsinki.  Finland is  .fi

Sorry to be critical, but  bnh.fi  is not quick & easy to understand or remember.

Going to the site becomes worse: at http://bnh.fi/en/share-your-helsinki-2020/ they offer a two-minute video, half in Finnish -- without subtitles. It effectively draws attention to difficulties with Finnish language, and a local disregard for non-Finns.

I do believe Helsinki, and Finland generally, could compete for top global talent. But they're relying upon bad advice filtered through a rigid, well-paid bureaucracy.

Fundamentally they need to overcome a chilly dark environment, a somewhat drab population (who themselves dream to escape), a perceived proximity to Chernobyl, relatively poor multicultural infrastructure, etc. etc. Worse, they're competing against places who began long ago to seriously invest in the high-stakes Place Appeal effort.

Finland (and Helsinki) must analyze the importance of Place Appeal to cultivate investment, generate tourism, attract mobile experts, and develop creative talent.

They need to understand the HUGE economic impact of the Place Appeal investment versus collapsing property values & continually watching creative people migrate away. For any locality seeking good future positioning, spending a few million euro is actually nothing compared to the many costs of failing to thrive.

Wish them luck.        but...
... at this rate, Helsinki's marketers fulfill their rhyming destiny:
FINISH






Short .com Domains are Valuable !

It's still possible for smaller businesses and private individuals to own short .com domains without investing many hundreds of thousands of dollars. The LLLL.com domains (four letters) are perhaps the shortest easily achievable, with many priced far below US$10,000.

Such very short domains are quite easy to resell if desired; an investment put to use! Don't forget: with a great domain you can create both a permanent web presence and also unlimited great email addresses. Happy shopping!

Here are some bargains:


 
iowu.com 
Couq.com 
Peuv.com 
9ass.com 
Rub2.com 
D--r.com 
inn3.com 
Ate3.com 
Kat2.com 
Num8.com 
Ozwk.com 
USD3.com 
N0M0.com 
64oz.com 
K--t.com 
24vv.com 
ero7.com 
7up7.com 
6mom.com 
4ray.org 
6kid.com 
rny8.com 
6an6.com 
4orr.com 
2nag.com 
69nu.com 
4got.org 
16-4.com 
2--4.com 
M--m.com 
69dr.com 
3jet.com 
5cab.com 
4sme.com 
2Feb.com 
Zjoq.com 

Invest in China

There are many ways to protect and to multiply your money. Probably, diversification is important -- don't invest all your funds in one company's stocks, or all in gold. Spread your investments into different formats for protection. Digital assets promise future growth.

China is growing. China has a bright future. Chinese people have only begun to discover the value of great domain names, and that there is a dynamic market for premium domains.

It is possible to buy fundamental one-character .com Chinese names, such as  子.com

Better, buy a .com portfolio of 500 single-character names

The investment portfolio costs US$1.2 million. Value in five years could be 10 times, maybe 50 times more!  Good luck; but act fast -- only one collection available at:
http://reorient.com/invest

High Way

Medical marijuana, pot & cannabis are growing industries. Many people might themselves happily refuse to smoke reefer, but why should we deprive cancer-ridden elderly in the midst of chemotherapy & radiation treatment, who claim eating marijuana cookies takes their mind off pain, with minimal side effects.

We don't support illegality. But many U.S. states and assorted nations around the world allow use of marijuana for medical purposes, and some (Colorado) allow adult recreational usage (just for fun).

Colorado is reportedly the fastest growing economy in the United States (link).

Cannabis-related news & information is important, and hemp & marijuana domain names have been selling well. (Marijuana.com sold for US$4.20 million in 2011). Here are pot domains still available now, and at low prices:


420cocktail.com
                                            always420.com
BongBrand.com
                                            bongg.com
BudBrand.com
                                            BuddingBrand.com
ediblast.com
                                            edibled.com
ediblender.com
                                            edibless.com
Ediblessing.com
                                            Edibling.com
ediblink.com
                                            ediblitz.com
Faqdup.com
                                            GanjaTrust.com
GrowninHawaii.com
                                            GrownOnHawaii.com
HempBrandy.com
                                            HerbalHawaii.com
HerbBrand.com
                                            High-Potency.com
LikeBud.com
                                            LikeGanja.com
LikeReefer.com
                                            LikeToSmoke.com
Mediblended.com
                                            mediblender.com
Mediblending.com
                                            Medibless.com
Mediblessing.com
                                            Mediblink.com
MrStoned.com
                                            NuHigh.com
PotHot.com
                                            ProfitsHerbal.com
PunaJuice.com
                                            ReefBrand.com
ReeferBrand.com
                                            ReeferFund.com
Reefresher.com
                                            Reefreshment.com
Reefuse.com
                                            StoneBrand.com
Stoniness.com
                                            SurfBud.com
WeLovePot.com
                                            麻省.com
たばこ.com
                                            麻木.com
Хай.com
                                            胡麻.com
麻薬.com
                                            삼.com
禁酒.com
                                            Дым.com
Høj.com
                                            汉麻.com
Rökare.com
                                            ポット.com
Zedible.com

Clear opportunities in the 'edible' category, etc.

Which domain name do you think is most valuable?
Good luck !



Domain Sales Assistance

Afternic, GoDaddy, Sedo, Flippa and DomainNameSales.com each do decent work of supporting domain sales processes.

But there are many additional ways potential domain purchasers can be helped to better connect with domain owners.

I'd like to be able to sign-up for a Notification to learn when a website or domain price changes. This could greatly assist both potential buyers and sellers. Domaintools offers assorted monitor services (by paid subscription) for a wide universe of domains. But the above sales agents could easily offer such charting & monitoring for those portfolio they handle.

Should detail of who is 'watching' be shared with sellers? If I ran a firm named similarly to one I was monitoring, I'd prefer to stay anonymous (keeping price lower). As a general entrepreneur as yet uninvested in a name, perhaps I've no preference for anonymity. Agencies could offer both monitoring options.


Single-character Chinese .com

Single-character domains are not yet selling publicly for great amounts of money, but in a heartbeat that could change.

Only three ASCII English .com are operating: x.com, q.com and z.com

Other potential single-letter .com are reserved by the IANA (Internet Assigned Numbers Authority) since 1993, and not ever expected to be released. Some symbols such as ✫.com were purchased early and grandfathered to allow continued operation.

Single-character Chinese .com are now hugely undervalued. As China grows and gains confidence, many people will want native-language top domains. If hundreds of thousands of people desire a property, it becomes expensive. We see five years from now, Chinese single-character .com domains trading at US$20,000 to US$1,000,000+ each.

秘.com

買.com

旬.com

町.com

子.com

How soon will such great names be owned by Chinese companies?
Someone will wisely purchase the US$1.2 million .com portfolio now on sale. More than 500 one character .com domains, mainly Chinese / Japanese single characters. See full list at:

reorient.com/invest

Verisign Sucks?

Emboldened by Vox Populi's .sucks registry success, Verisign now seem ready to embark on the "legalized extortion" path.

Will IDN.com domain holders be denied the grandfathering Verisign promised for many years? Verisign avoided domain name community complaints about transliteration confusion by promoting exclusive cross-linkages between the assorted versions of .com (or .net). Now they've a contract and suddenly sing a different tune.

Classic bait-and-switch.

They assured us: "the registrant for a second-level domain name in our IDN.IDN, IDN.com or IDN.net will have the sole right (subject to applicable rights protection mechanisms), but not be required to register that identical second-level domain in any of the top-level IDNs."

Hopefully Verisign will reconsider. Dissolving the IDN.IDN link to .com (or .net) weakens Verisign's position & suitability as contracted authoritative registry for .com and .net -- making a future switch away from Verisign easier: the .com contract expires end Nov. 2018.

Verisign Lies?

http://www.verisigninc.com/en_GB/channel-resources/domain-registry-products/idn/index.xhtml?loc=en_GB
Verisign has now been promising for many years as follows:

"In 2012, Verisign applied to operate registries for eight transliterations of .COM and three of .NET (to the right of the dot) as part of ICANN’s new generic top-level domain (gTLD) which will allow Verisign to bring businesses full domain names in local language characters.

Verisign’s proposed approach for these new IDN gTLDs will help ensure a ubiquitous end-user experience and helps to protect consumers and business from having to register purely defensive domain names in our TLDs. In practice, Verisign’s proposed approach means that the registrant for a second-level domain name in our IDN.IDN, IDN.com or IDN.net will have the sole right (subject to applicable rights protection mechanisms), but not be required to register that identical second-level domain in any of the top-level IDNs, .COM or .NET as applicable.

In order to illustrate our approach, we have identified two use cases below:
Use Case No. 1: Bob Smith already has a registration for an IDN.net second level domain name. That second level domain name will be unavailable in all of the new .NET TLDs except to Bob Smith. Bob Smith may choose not to register that second level domain name in any of the new transliterations of the .NET TLDs.
Use Case No. 2: John Doe does not have a registration for an IDN.com second level domain name. John Doe registers a second level domain name in our Thai transliteration of .COM but in no other TLD. That second level domain name will be unavailable in all other transliterations of .COM IDN TLDs and in the .COM registry unless and until John Doe (and only John Doe) registers it in another .COM IDN TLD or in the .COM registry"
(end quote)

But yesterday in Verisign's Q2 2015 Earnings Report Conference Call, it all seems revealed as empty promises.

Jim Bidzos, Verisign Executive Chairman, President and CEO, stated:
"Based primarily on feedback from domain name community stakeholders, we have revised our IDN launch strategy. We will offer these new IDN top-level domains as stand-alone domain names, subject to normal introductory availability and rights protection mechanisms available to all new gTLDs. This revised approach will not require ICANN approval and is designed to provide end users and businesses with the greatest flexibility; and, for registrars, a simple and straightforward framework to serve the market. Finally, we believe this approach should provide the best opportunity for increased universal acceptance of IDNs. We expect to begin a phased rollout of the IDNs towards the end of this year. And we'll provide more information on our launch plans when appropriate."
Pat Kane later adds detail: they plan to launch without the cross-linkages they promised.

Maybe I misread, but it appears blatant bait-and-switch by Verisign.
Can the weasels unilaterally take away residual rights promised & promoted for many years?

Domains = Bullish (or bullshit?)

I'm consistently bullish on the future promise of premium domain names. The internet continues to expand globally, with great names (especially .com) in high demand.

But let's not be blind.

There are major impediments to successful domain investing. Choosing & handling hundreds (or thousands) of domains requires multiple skill types.

Domain markets are not very liquid, so it can be difficult to sell quickly.

Worse, major registrars and parking companies are themselves in business as direct competitors. Almost all of these firms buy and sell domains, and catch names at the daily drop. It's hazardous to need to rely upon your competitors to run your business. Within the domain industry there's much secrecy about parking revenues and domain sales amounts. A few major players are positioned to know and learn much more than the average joe. This leads inevitably to conflict-of-interest situations.

Major industry news and blogger reports reflect the prejudices and needs of competitive forces far larger than the typical small investor.

Some 100,000 domains drop everyday.

Each dropped name is a dream that didn't work out -- a failed project.

Sure there are exceptions (ten years later, event2004.com may naturally be worth little). But such exceptions are few.

Every drop is a list of broken dreams, a trail of tears.

Celebrate success, but recognize risk.

 


Verisign transliterations: aliasing .com



Verisign will offer chances for aliasing .com with these nine transliterations:

.com
(present Western) 

.ком
Cyrillic
xn--j1aef

קום.
Hebrew
xn--9dbq2a

كوم.
Arabic
xn--fhbei

.कॉम
Devanagari
xn--11b4c3d

.คอม
Thai
xn--42c2d9a

.コム
Katakana
xn--tckwe

.
Simplified Chinese
xn--3pxu8k

.
Hangul
xn--mk1bu44c




Verisign IDN update

Verisign sometimes refers to their IDN.IDN activities as "aliasing"

Excerpts from their Q1 2015 Earnings Report conference call:
23 April 2015

Jim Bidzos (Chairman, President and CEO):
"One way VeriSign has been participating in ICANN's new gTLD program was by applying for internationalized domain name transliterations of .com and .net. We have signed 11 IDN TLD registry agreements and are seeking a modified sunrise period from ICANN... we have submitted our request for this modified sunrise period and are awaiting the response from ICANN.  The failure to gain approval could delay a general availability date or could result in VeriSign having to revise our go-to-market strategy for the IDNs."

Pat Kane (SVP - Naming and Directory Services):
"The process that we have to go through, it starts off with what is called pre-delegation, which will happen in early May [2015]. And then, there is a controlled interruption phase, which lasts for 90 days which actually has to deal with name collisions and making sure that there is not any unwanted behaviors within the new gTLD space, and then we would launch after that at the earliest. So it really all depends upon, though, getting approval from ICANN on the modified sunrise period and seeing what we can do from there. ...There are no set prices within the new registry agreements for the IDN TLDs."

David Atchley (VP, Treasury and IR):
"We are free to set any initial price that we choose under the new registry agreement, and the only requirement should we choose to change those prices would be a six-month notice period. We have additional flexibility in that we applied for 11 of these IDNs. Most of them are .com. Some of them are .net. All of them are spread across different countries and different local language character sets. And we are free, also, to price differently in those geographies or differently for .com or .net. We have complete flexibility in how we price those products."

500+ Single-character .com !

What will US$1.2 million buy?
Possibly far greater riches? 

The world's top .com Single-Character Investment Portfolio (SCIP) is now on sale. Get 500 one character .com domains, mainly Chinese / Japanese single characters.

See full list at:
reorient.com/invest



This is the only major single-character .com portfolio available, anywhere.

500 domains:  

  • investment
  • wealth protection
  • financial diversification
                                                                     
Hurry!  One-of-a-kind investment portfolio.
These domains are especially attractive to Asia-related businesses. 
Especially China: surely a growing internet powerhouse. 
Digital Assets have a bright future ahead!

Benefit early from Verisign's new global strategy:
.com transliterated / localized to 8 languages

Verisign's published IDN.IDN strategy:
The IDN.com registrant will have the sole right, but not be required to register the exact same second level name across any or all of the eight Verisign IDN TLDs.
Even with strategy adjustments, you'll be active from the start!  Buy Now.

Courtesy to brokers.
bruce@reorient.com

Reorient.com available

Recent announcement from reorient.com -- the website's for sale.

Exciting for those with corresponding projects, but the announced 2 million euro price tag will dissuade those not highly motivated.

Announcing Change

Domain sales platforms could rather easily institute an announcement service: interested people could be notified when a domain price is adjusted.

Some people would benefit greatly from such a service, and I suppose sales would be boosted.

 

IDN.IDN Verisign (cont.)

Verisign's policy on IDN.IDN implementation, and the rights protection format they expect to follow, has been very explicit, with a key objective: "Avoid costs to consumers and businesses from purely defensive registrations in the new gTLDs"

"A registrant in one of the IDN TLDs, or a registrant of an IDN.com or IDN.net, will have the sole right, but not be required to register the exact same second level name across all or any of our IDN TLDs, including the .com or .net TLDs as applicable."

( see the Verisign explanation here -- link )


Verisign IDN.IDN

ICANN & Verisign have signed agreement on Verisign's IDN.IDN applications (the petitions for .com and .net gTLD alternatives were pending since 13 June 2012).

Contracts were signed (link) 15 January 2015 (点看 example).

This should be great news for IDN.com domain owners, and for mobile handset users. International transliterations potentially infringe on existing .com & .net registrants, and Verisign pledged to protect existing registrant rights at minimal registrant cost. It's unclear if the present explanation on the Verisign webpages (as of 25 January, below) is still fully accurate. I asked Verisign, who replied: "ICANN has told us that we will have to submit a Registry Services (RSEP) request regarding the approach we plan to use."

Verisign's registration policy is explained on their website as follows:
https://www.verisigninc.com/en_US/channel-resources/domain-registry-products/idn/index.xhtml

"Verisign’s proposed approach for these new IDN gTLDs will help ensure a ubiquitous end-user experience, and helps to protect consumers and business from having to register purely defensive domain names in our TLDs. In practice, Verisign’s proposed approach means that the registrant for a second-level domain name in our IDN.IDN, IDN.com or IDN.net will have the sole right (subject to applicable rights protection mechanisms), but not be required to register that identical second-level domain in any of the top-level IDNs, .com or .net as applicable."


"In order to illustrate our approach, we have identified two use cases below:
Use Case No. 1: Bob Smith already has a registration for an IDN.net second level domain name. That second level domain name will be unavailable in all of the new .net TLDs except to Bob Smith. Bob Smith may choose not to register that second level domain name in any of the new transliterations of the .net TLDs.
Use Case No. 2: John Doe does not have a registration for an IDN.com second level domain name. John Doe registers a second level domain name in our Thai transliteration of .com but in no other TLD. That second level domain name will be unavailable in all other transliterations of .com IDN TLDs and in the .com registry unless and until John Doe (and only John Doe) registers it in another .com IDN TLD or in the .com registry."

In mid-2013, Pat Kane offered ICANN more detail about Verisign's IDN.IDN plans:
https://www.icann.org/resources/correspondence/kane-to-willett-2013-07-11-en


Update from VeriSign conference call, 5 February 2015
Jim Bidzos, VeriSign Chairman, President, CEO:
"We have signed the registry agreements for .comsec and 11 IDN TLDs, eight of which are transliterations of .com and three are transliterations of .net"

"While these registry agreements with ICANN are signed, before these domains become generally available, a few more steps remain, including delegation, controlled interruption which deals with potential name collisions, completion of a sunrise period, and finalization and approval of our launch plans. The failure to gain approval, if required, could delay a general availability date or could result in Verisign having to revise our go-to-market strategy for the IDNs."

Ugly Words? Mediocrity...

In researching domain names available in assorted languages, I repeatedly see a pile of castoff words that seem slightly ugly. Domain investors and internet developers perhaps naturally gravitate to words with positive or glowing meanings, and leave behind those that are dirty or painful.

But this is foolish.

In fact, "pain" (for example) is an important & valuable word. Many people need help with pain, and your site built upon such a memorable keyword can both steer sufferers in worthwhile directions, and easily make you substantial advertising and referral money. Plus it's good to help!

Are there "bad" words? If so, they are probably words such as "mild" and tolerable and mediocre... But words infused with assorted types of energy, emotion, and even pathos are GREAT !


One-word Domain Names

"Having the domain we have has really helped us punch above our weight in so many ways. It is something that touches on almost every interaction. And when people come to us, there is an assumption that we are a much bigger operation than we really are. We are a small business (but) we just did a big promotion with Coca Cola, so we had the Wish logo on 14 million cans of Fanta in the UK."

"If you look the part, (with) a name that sounds like where you want to be, you are in so much of a stronger position to take advantage of those kinds of opportunities."

--  Richard Kershaw, Wish.co.uk interviewed at Domain Sherpa

 

Squatbranding, Tradesquatting

Wake Up ... if you can !

People don't complain enough about corporatization, when bandits in business suits encroach on our lives.


squatbranding - to incorporate in generic space; to acquire or arrogate a common word or phrase as a corporate brand.

Shortcut-seeking scum too often plonk themselves down in our common space & claim permanence, saying in essence "Fuck you - now move around me!"

Squatbranded regular words are shamelessly hijacked from common history and our general dictionaries:
amazon
apple
total
mars
delta 
caterpillar
intel
orange
target
vail
carrefour ("crossroad")
shell
metro
continental
oracle

They're our words first. The wider community has long prior use of those words - still shortcut-seeking scum try shoving us aside with ® trademark appropriation. We need to push back. Imagine brands such as apple™ paying us more to squat in our common space. We must visualize them sporting the SQUATBRAND mark (Not a call to deface their operations!)

Those starting a new venture should coin new terms, as did the creators of Localversity or Google.

Ventures that chose to brand on a novel descriptive phrase seem rather OK: Kentucky Fried Chicken, Japan Railways, Smell Museum

Can't complain too much of firms trading on a family name: McDonalds, Honda, DuPont

But we shouldn't need to tiptoe around squatbranded regular words.

Corrupt officials and smutty nobility, if they could, would sell our kids for meat, renting Our Heritage cheaply to the first shyster paying registration. Too often it's a Squatbrand





Property to Develop

Expanding on the vision of  Domains as Billboards:
I've been surprised by people antagonistic toward domainers (domain developers & salespeople). The folks upset are often misinformed of business reality.

Many have read about someone 'squatting' on a proprietary name, trying to extort a huge sum from a trademark owner. (Why this troubles people is complex - relating more to easy money envy & comeuppance than with true sympathy for behemoth multinationals).

But such frictions are a tiny segment of domaining. Our world has millions of generic words and new-coined names to profitably link customers with information, goods & services. These words and phrases are from all languages -- each now has an internet address you can own, use, rent or sell.

Businesses increasingly use generic domain names as gateway billboards to their commercial services -- also, when purchased, that path is closed to competitors. 

Be the authoritative site for your specialty - buy multiple domains to link your operations with worldwide success.

Get that key real estate now !
help@strongestbrands.com